Chemical elements
  Oxygen
    Phlogiston
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
    Ozone
    Atmosphere
    Water
    Hydrogen peroxide
      Formation
      Synthesis
      Concentration
      Preservation
      Physical Properties
      Chemical Properties
      Catalytic Decomposition
      Self Reduction
      Oxidation Processes
      Applications
      Detection and Estimation

Applications of hydrogen peroxide






Applications of hydrogen peroxide is related largely as a bleaching agent for materials such as feathers, hair, wood, bone, ivory, and skins where the action of chlorine or sulphur dioxide might harmfully affect the article; it has the especial advantage that, after its action, nothing more harmful than water remains; in order to accelerate the action of the hydrogen peroxide, a small quantity of a mild alkali such as magnesium oxide or ammonia is often added. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide has also been suggested as a method for the removal of the excess of chlorine or sulphur dioxide in compounds which have been bleached with these agents. On account of its marked disinfectant and antiseptic action, hydrogen peroxide in dilute aqueous solution is of value as a wash for open wounds and is also frequently applied as a preservative in milk.

The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by finely divided metals has been suggested as the basis of a photographic process. An ethereal solution of the peroxide is wiped over the negative when, after the evaporation of the ether, the residual hydrogen peroxide film undergoes rapid decomposition at the dark portions of the negative. If a gelatinised but unsensitised paper is then applied to the glass, the undecomposed hydrogen peroxide is partially absorbed by the gelatinised surface of the paper from the transparent portions of the negative and, when subsequently dipped in a suitable solution, e.g. an ammoniacal solution of manganese sulphate, a brown " positive " print appears on the paper.

The value of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidising agent for analytical and preparative purposes can easily be realised from the foregoing description of its properties and, indeed, was recognised early in its history.


© Copyright 2008-2012 by atomistry.com